Leicester assistant manager Craig Shakespeare was ecstatic after the Foxes scored six goals in a league match for the first time in 25 years against Ipswich at the King Power stadium.

City beat Ipswich 6-0 to end a winless run of four games. The last time they scored six goals in a league match was against Sheffield Wednesday at Filbert Street in January 1987.

"You hope if you turn in the performances you put in a result like that," Shakespeare said. "Over the course of the season I think some of the football and attacking play has been outstanding. But we have, in all honesty, missed the chances. There is no getting away from that."

He added: "But, as in any game, it was very important to get the first goal. When we got that it seemed to settle everyone down a bit. Then, to go and score the amount we did and share the goals around, I thought we were very, very professional from start to finish. It was a very accomplished performance.

"I have worked with Lloyd Dyer since he was a young boy at West Brom and I think that in the last few weeks he has been playing he best football of his career. He has got that one thing that defenders are frightened of - pace. And it caused Ipswich a lot of problems. It was a good dressing room to be in afterwards but it is only one game.

"But we have done well and it bodes well."

Ipswich manager Mick McCarthy described his side's performance as "awful and abject."

He said: "We are brittle and timid at the minute and if you want to describe it as awful and abject I am quite happy with that to be fair. We talk about being hard to beat and not doing anything stupid and then we give away a penalty. The manner in which we conceded the goals was dreadful. It was embarrassing to be honest.

"It hurts me as a manager because I take pride in my teams being organised, tough, resolute and hard to beat.

"There is no point arguing about whether it was a penalty or not. If we had gone across and cleared the ball there would be no penalty. This was awful. There were no positives and we have to try and make sure it doesn't happen again."