Birmingham manager Lee Clark hailed veteran midfielder Hayden Mullins for his impact following his performance in the 1-0 win over Leeds.

Clark had every reason to be pleased with his revitalised Birmingham side as they moved into 10th place - their highest since last September.

It was only Birmingham's third home victory of the year and they were indebted to Mullins, who scored his second goal of the season on his return to the side after missing the last 19 games.

Clark paid credit to the 34-year-old who made his 550th league appearance, and said: "I plumped for experience on this occasion. I thought that the way Leeds were playing with a new manager I just wanted an older head to look after the likes of (Ross) McCormack and he did it well.

"I didn't include Hayden to be the match winner but it was a good occasion to celebrate his 550th game. It was a terrific win so far as I am concerned I'm delighted with the three points and a clean sheet.

"We played really well in the first half although we became a little sloppy at the start of the second period. But we then got the goal and kicked on from there and in the last 10 minutes we had further chances to kill off the game."

Following two successive wins under new boss Brian McDermott, Leeds came back down to earth with another away defeat.

Despite the defeat, McDermott is still feeling optimistic about the future at Elland Road and said: "We should have got something out of the game. When it was 0-0 we were on top and then they scored from nothing. When I arrived at the club I put my reputation on the line and to make sure Leeds remained in this division. As I am concerned it is job done.

"Everyone must be going in the same direction. If that occurs in this club you have a major chance. I think we have to talk about who needs to come in. If we can add to the squad with good quality players who know this division we should progress.

"Leeds were possibly in trouble when I came in. I am delighted with the boys. They played two games at home and we won them both. They were pressure games."