Chesterfield manager Paul Cook has not given up hope of reaching the play-offs after second-half strikes from Jay O'Shea and Sam Togwell reignited the Spireites' promotion charge with a 2-0 win over Barnet.

After a lacklustre first half, Cook revealed he laid into his players at the break demanding they treat the game like a cup final to keep touch with the top seven.

And he got the response he wanted as first O'Shea and then Togwell found the back of the net to put Chesterfield within three points of seventh-placed Exeter.

"We didn't play well," the former Accrington boss said of his team's first-half display. "The first half was probably as poor as I've seen us play. It looked like an end of season game when we had nothing to play for and the paint came off the walls at half time.

"(In the) second half we improved and got a couple of good goals and played a lot better. The message at half time was liven up. The pleasing thing was we dug in and I thought we finished the second half quite well.

"At the minute every game is a big pressure game for us. If we get beat it's like the end. We have four games left and all of a sudden we seem to have a lot to play for. But what we have to play for is next Saturday against Bradford and that's the only game in my mind.

"This was a big one, all games are big and there's none bigger that Bradford for us next week."

Barnet forced 18 corners in the match but were unable to make them count and now sit just two points clear of the drop zone.

"If you have so many corners and you have the better of the play you should get something from the game," said player-manager Edgar Davids. "We didn't give away too many chances in the first half and they get half a chance and they score. That's the way football is.

"We always go for the win and how we go for the win is not important but we have to go for the win. We played a top 10 team, we out played them and we were the better team but then you see why they are at that level because they get half a chance and they score and that is the difference."